Republican congressional candidate Mike Yost hosted a district-wide “Patriot Walk” to drum up support for his campaign Saturday. In each of the nine counties that make up District 3 (which is currently represented by nine-term incumbent Corrine Brown), supporters made their rounds, handing out pamphlets and carrying signs for a candidate who says he has “a vision for a renewed district.”

In addition to offering ideas on eliminating high unemployment and working toward education reform, Yost is generally outspoken on the issue of undocumented workers. When questioned about a recent endorsement by a controversial immigration group, Yost’s campaign was optimistic. Yost received an endorsement from the conservative group Americans for Legal Immigration, for which he and several other candidates signed a pledge saying that, if elected, they would “use the full power” of their office, “including impeachment if necessary, to insure the Executive Branch secures America’s border immediately and begins to adequately enforce the existing immigration and border laws of the United States.”

During Saturday’s event, Yost showed no signs of sharing the highly controversial and often homophobic sentiments of the group that endorsed him, but that doesn’t mean he rejects Americans for Legal Immigration’s support.

“I’m 100 percent for legal immigration,” he said when asked about his stance on illegal immigration. “The system in place is an archaic system. There are people that have lived here 20, 25 years, and can’t seem to get through the bureacratic paperwork. … I also think there’s a reluctance to follow the laws 100 percent.”

Nick Zoller, Yost’s campaign manager, said this when questioned about Americans for Legal Immigration’s endorsement: “Mr. Yost is for legal immigration, but he would support reforms to the immigration system. He supports the laws on the books, and that is basically what that pledge meant. We are happy with any endorsement and anyone that supports Mike’s candidacy.”

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