Perhaps you’re about to graduate high school and have a passion for technology. You don’t necessarily feel like the traditional route of higher education is for you.

You aren’t the only one.

A recent $412 million dollar acquisition of one of the best coding bootcamps shows how higher education is changing.

You’ve heard about coding bootcamps and are wondering what exactly do you learn, and what it’s actually like to attend one. The idea of getting practical digital skills in coding in as little as 12 weeks is appealing.

Are you looking to learn code in an intensive and dedicated environment? Thinking about joining a bootcamp?

Let’s find out what attending one may be like.

What Are the Best Coding Bootcamps Actually Like to Attend?

Before you submit your application to a coding bootcamp, you will want to know more about what they teach, how long the program is, and what it costs. You will also want to know how fast you will get a job.

According to Course Report, 79% of graduates of coding bootcamps found jobs within 120 days or less.  Also, the average person entering a bootcamp made about $47,000 before the bootcamp and about $71,000 after attending.

Let’s clear up the basics about what coding is first, as well as the definition of bootcamp. Coding involves digital skills such as web development, data science, digital marketing, and UX/UI Marketing. A bootcamp is a class that is a shorter, more intensive, and has practical application.

For example, with a computer science degree, you may spend 4+ years getting your degree and have a few internships. In comparison, your coding bootcamps will be complete as fast as in 12-24 weeks. It will also have more time coding in web development, data science, and digital marketing.

Here is what the best coding bootcamps are like.

Free Intro to Coding

Before you decide whether you want to attend a coding bootcamp, you may want to take a free intro to coding.

This is a simple beginner course to help you see if coding and a coding bootcamp is for you. With any coding experience, you will want to schedule a session with an advisor for admissions and finances.

Eleven Fifty Academy

Eleven Fifty offers two free courses on coding and cybersecurity for you to get an initial sense of whether coding bootcamp is for you. They offer both full-time and part-time immerse options.

Their options include coding and cybersecurity, Javascript, and more. You can expect to experience a real-time immersion into what you’ll be doing in coding.

They offer scholarships and financial aid for tuition. 

Flatiron, Assembly, and Thinkful

These are similar coding bootcamps that may offer both online options and local options for you. They have also created a free coding prep bootcamp online for you to test drive.

They provide insights into data and placements with a 97% employment rate and $74,000 starting salary post-graduation.

Final Thoughts on the Top Coding Bootcamps

In summary, the best coding bootcamps may be 100% online, offer live classes, and include hands-on practical coding projects. They’re intensive programs that you can complete in less than a year with attractive opportunities. 

Feel free to explore more information on technology via our blog.

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How NEOFECT Created a Smart Glove (Robotic Arm) That Uses Online Gaming for Rehabilitation

Wearable technology keeps evolving. And it is transforming the way we experience the world. Watches, eyeglasses, rings, bracelets and even smart home devices like the thermostat are changing how we consumer information, monitor our health and use home products. Smart technology has a significant role to play in how people will live in the future.

NEOFECT wants to change how to aid rehabilitation and the provision of clinicial real-time patient data. In an interview with  Scott Kim, Neofect’s co-founder and CEO of the US office, he spoke to us about how he started NEOFECT, the company’s success factors and challenges they have faced in their bid to change physical therapy using online gaming.

Brief summary about your startup

Established in 2010, NEOFECT is a mobile health startup with a vision to deliver an affordable and effective at-home system to aid neuro patients with central nervous system disorders such as a stroke.

Its first product, RAPAEL Smart Glove, combines a wearable device, virtual reality and gamification for rehab exercise, while its software analyzes the data from built-in sensors and provides training tasks based on the patient’s activity level.

The device has been successfully employed by a number of major hospitals in South Korea since December of 2014, and approved for use in the US and Europe. NEOFECT has offices in S. Korea, San Francisco, and Poland.

Why and how it was started

The President of NEOFECT, Ho-Young Ban, experienced first-hand the difficulties faced by stroke patients and their families when his father and two uncles fell victims of stroke.

Although his uncles were fortunate to survive, they had to turn down the rehab therapy because of the costs involved. So, when his friend Young Choi came up with an idea of Rapael, Ban could not resist.

Soon after, their classmate from the University of Virginia’s Darden MBA program Scott Kim joined the team to launch the US operations.

Kim was born with spinal bifida and went through a surgery and a long rehabilitation process, so he immediately recognized the opportunity and became a co-founder and the CEO of the Neofect’s US office.

What has been the biggest success factors

Personal motivation of the founders combined with the latest, most advanced smart technologies have become the major engines behind the company’s success.

– Gamification, which motivates a patient throughout the rehab process. It helps to induce neuroplasticity for hand function of a patient with a brain damage.

Various rehab games are updated monthly and each game targets specific movements such as squeezing the orange for finger flexion/extension and pouring wine for forearm pronation/supination, for example.

– Artificial Intelligence: the software analyzes data from the glove’s sensors and provides training tasks based on the patient’s activity level. The algorithm is designed to enhance learning multiple functions by offering an optimal task at a proper level of difficulty.

– Wearable Device: RAPAEL Smart Glove is a wearable bio-feedback training gadget. Lightweight and designed to fit different hand sizes, it uses the Bluetooth technology to collect the patient’s data.

What are the biggest challenges you have faced launching and running the company?

The biggest challenge was the product’s concept itself. Many people believed that Rapael could be a threat to the therapists. Fortunately, after we launched the program in several hospitals, we’ve been able to prove that our device is designed with the doctors’ and patient’s needs in mind and helps them make the rehabilitation process more efficient.

Which do you think is most important: the right market, the right product, or the right team?

This sounds like a cliché, but the right team is easily the answer to me. With the right people, you can make necessary adjustments based on new information to make sure there is a product-market fit.

My previous job was to lead a team to make mobile apps – without any exception, all great apps loved by users were made by great teams.

Final words for those chasing the startup dream

Never underestimate the importance of execution. Many people waste their time just to validate what they think or others think, or even just to finish the conceptualization.

However, you should “fail fast” in order concentrate your efforts on building a product which has a market demand, and of course, to save time and money as well.

Plus, you should fail while you are small rather than big, if you’re meant to face it. The earlier you do the reality check, the faster you can reach your goal, although it might cost you a couple of failures at the beginning.

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