Rep.-elect Allen West, R-Fort Lauderdale — one of two black Republicans elected last week to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first African-American Republicans voted into the House since 2003 — plans to join the Congressional Black Caucus, which currently contains all Democrats: 41 House members and Illinois Sen. Roland Burris.

In an interview with WOR radio, West said, “I plan on joining, I’m not going to ask for permission or whatever, I’m going to find out when they meet and I will be a member of the Congressional Black Caucus and I think I meet all of the criteria and it’s so important that we break down this ‘monolithic voice’ that continues to talk about victimization and dependency in the black community.”

A CBC spokesperson declined to comment to The Hill’s Mike Lillis, a former Washington Independent reporter.

The Congressional Black Caucus campaigned against West this fall. Rep. Alcee Hastings, D-Fort Lauderdale, raised money and campaigned for West’s opponent, Rep. Ron Klein, as did Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga.

West called the NAACP a “liberal racist enabler” in a post on Biggovernment.com. Since 1969, the Congressional Black Caucus has had two black Republicans as members.

Luke Johnson reports on Florida for The American Independent.

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