Two amendments on the Florida ballot that would establish new rules for how legislative and congressional districts are redrawn every 10 years are poised to meet the 60 percent threshold required to approve the measure, moving the state closer to the rest of the nation with regard to specific and robust redistricting laws, which are currently lacking in Florida.

The new laws would require that districts adhere to existing city and county boundaries, as well as geographic considerations, and ultimately seek to limit the drawing of district lines that would serve to favor incumbents or political parties.

Nearly 80 percent of precincts are reporting, and according to Florida Election Watch Amendment 5, which deals with legislative districts, is hovering at just over 62 percent, while Amendment 6, which focuses on congressional districts, sits at nearly 63 percent.

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