ThinkProgress reported this week that presidential candidate Herman Cain was once a spokesperson for America PAC — a radical group that “among other things, suggested Democrats wanted to ‘kill black babies.’”

A Gallup poll released today shows that Cain holds the No. 5 spot in the GOP presidential primary. Cain jumped from 1 percent to 8 percent in one month. He is now ahead of candidates such as Tim Pawlenty and Rick Santorum.

It has been reported in the past that Cain claimed Planned Parenthood’s true objective is to “kill black babies before they came into the world” — a claim PolitiFact gave its highest level of inaccuracy.

ThinkProgress reported yesterday that Cain was a spokesperson and performed voiceover work for ads “on black radio stations in swing states during the 2004 and 2006 elections” that said:

The Democratic Party supports these abortion laws that are decimating our people, but the individual’s right to life is protected in the Republican platform. Democrats say they want our vote. Why don’t they want our lives?

The ads were condemned by civil rights activists at the time; Cain, however, stood by them.

“The general concept of having ads that give people the facts, that tell people the truth — and, sometimes, the truth hurts,” he said.

Cain made an appearance in Florida last month for a tax day rally in Orlando. Sen. Marco Rubio and Ralph Reed also attended.

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