Democratic governor candidate Alex Sink announced she will release five years’ worth of personal tax returns and is calling for her Republican opponent Rick Scott to do the same. In June, Scott’s rival in the Republican primary, Bill McCollum, challenged Scott to release his tax returns. He declined. Scott’s camp responds that they will release tax returns for the general election.

Sink’s campaign maintains this is a 40-year tradition in Florida politics, dating back to former Gov. Reuben Askew in 1970, and that releasing the info shows “a strong commitment to openness and transparency for the people of Florida.” Republican Govs. Bob Martinez, Jeb Bush and Charlie Crist (now an independent candidate for U.S. Senator), along with Democratic Govs. Bob Graham and Lawton Chiles, all released several years’ worth of tax returns. Floridians “deserve to know about a governor’s background and finances,” Sink stated in a press release.

Sink states she and her husband will post returns from 2005 to 2009 online next week. Scott listed a net worth of $218 million on his financial disclosure form.

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