Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., pushed further than the Obama Administration while responding to the mass protests in Egypt, writing in a blog post for The Hill Monday evening that the country’s embattled president must submit to free and fair elections — in short, Hosni Mubarak “will have to go.”

The administration has so far used cautious rhetoric, which Nelson describes as an effort to avoid retreading the Iranian Revolution of 1979, when the toppling of a U.S.-sponsored dictator allowed a fundamentalist regime to seize power, a prospect that has prompted fears in other countries, including Israel.

In an effort to calm the protests and cling to power, Mubarak has appointed a new vice president and ordered him to begin negotiating with the opposition and has sworn in a new cabinet. Not enough, Nelson wrote. Mubarak should announce plans to put his presidency (which has so far spanned three decades) on the line in elections that measure up to international standards:

To put real credibility into the promises of reform, President Mubarak should immediately submit to this core principle of democracy.

The next presidential election in Egypt is scheduled for September of this year. Right now, there are no term limits in Egypt’s constitution restricting Mubarak from running for re-election for the sixth time.

Mubarak must immediately open these elections to international observers and give his written assurance that his name won’t appear as a contender. I believe this could help quell the protests.

Read the whole thing.

0 Shares:
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Broward Republicans say redistricting proposals for Allen West are unconstitutional

The Miami Herald today published an open letter from Broward County GOP chairman Richard DeNapoli to the Florida Legislature's redistricting committees. In it, DeNapoli sharply criticizes state lawmakers' proposals for how Rep. Allen West's district should be redrawn, saying they doesn't live up to the Fair Districts standards approved by Florida voters in November 2010.

Third state committee gave money to Brown, Diaz-Balart’s lawsuit funds

The Orlando Sentinel broke news last month about a pair of Florida political committees associated with state legislators that had donated $10,000 apiece to the legal expense funds of Reps. Corrine Brown, D-Jacksonville, and Mario Diaz-Balart. That money is being used to sue to block anti-gerrymandering Amendment 6. But a review of the records of Brown and Diaz-Balart's legal expense funds, accessible only in person in Washington, D.C., and obtained by our sister site The American Independent, shows that a third committee, associated with state Sen. Mike Bennett, R-Bradenton, also gave money in June.