Senator-elect Marco Rubio (R) will head to Israel Sunday, reports Israeli news site Ynetnews.

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With victory in the congressional elections less than a day old, Florida Senator Marco Rubio (Rep.) who considers himself a ‘Tea Party’ member, is set to arrive in Israel on Sunday. Rubio’s visit so soon after the election win is a move that strengthens assessments that the congress in its current form will continue where it left off – at least where Israel is concerned.

Rubio gave a speech on Israel in June to the Republican Jewish Coalition “about the need for the United States to stand with Israel without equivocation or hesitation,” criticizing the Obama Administration’s handling of the U.S.-Israel relationship.

He also called on the U.S. to move its embassy to Jerusalem and said that the U.S. should not push Israel to freeze settlements before negotiations. Like America, he said that Israel was an “exceptional” nation.

Neoconservatives loved Rubio’s talk. Jennifer Rubin of Commentary called it the best speech on Israel “since George W. Bush went to the Knesset.”

His belief that the U.S. should support Israel unequivocally puts him squarely with the Republican Party’s foreign policy thinking on Israel.

Luke Johnson reports on Florida for The American Independent.

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