Tomorrow, Republican David Rivera will be sworn in as a congressman from the 25th District of Florida. But today the Republican representative-elect admitted that he received $137,000 in loans from a company co-owned by his mother that received payments from Flagler Dog Track as it was campaigning the legislature to allow slot machines when Rivera was a state representative.

More from The Miami Herald:

Rivera told the Associated Press in an interview Monday that he repaid the $137,000 to his mother’s company, Millennium Marketing, sometime last year. Rivera also said he reported the loan in a new financial disclosure form he filed Monday with the U.S. House of Representatives, two days before he is expected to take the oath of office and begin his first term in Congress.

Rivera, a Republican from Miami, had never previously disclosed any loans from Millennium in financial statements filed as a congressional candidate, or during his prior tenure in the Florida legislature.

Rivera’s office could not provide a copy of the new disclosure form to The Miami Herald late Monday, though the document was reviewed by the AP.

Rivera encountered many ethical problems during his campaign for Congress, which he won easily.

He falsified claims on his state financial disclosure forms that he had worked as a contractor for USAID. He had to amend the forms to reflect that he had not, and questions arose over other sources of income beyond his $30,000 salary as a state representative. He also faced allegations that he had run a truck containing his opponent’s flyers off the Palmetto Expressway in a 2002 campaign.

Luke Johnson reports on Florida for The American Independent.

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