State employees and recipients of public assistance can expect new drug screening measures.

The same day a bill a Senate panel cleared a measure to drug-test people who receive public assistance (see this on the House version), Scott praised the measure and issued an executive order announcing mandatory drug screening for all new hires under his purview, as well as random testing for current employees.

Here’s the release:

Today, Governor Rick Scott applauded the work of legislative leaders to create mandatory drug testing for adults seeking assistance from Florida’s taxpayers.

“I want to commend Senators Steve Oelrich and Paula Dockery, and Representatives Jimmie Smith and Chris Dorworth, for their hard work on this issue,” Governor Scott stated. “Today’s committee passage by the Senate of Senate Bill 556 has advanced this important policy, and I look forward to the House moving their legislation tomorrow.”

Governor Scott’s support for drug testing those who would seek taxpayer-funded assistance is consistent with promises he made before his election.

In addition, Governor Scott announced Executive Order 11-58. This order will require pre-employment drug testing for all prospective new hires of agencies within the Governor’s purview. It will also require random drug testing of all current employees, from executive leadership to part-time employees.

“Floridians deserve to know that those in public service, whose salaries are paid with taxpayer dollars, are part of a drug-free workplace,” Governor Scott said. “Just as it is appropriate to screen those seeking taxpayer assistance, it is also appropriate to screen government employees.”

And here’s the executive order:

Scott Drug Testing Executive Order

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