Responding to news that Florida’s unemployment rate remained static, Gov. Rick Scott said today that the state is on the “right path.”

According to a press release from Scott’s office:

The August job numbers prove that when you reduce the size, scope and cost of government, it allows the private sector jobs to grow.

For every job lost in the public sector, Florida gained two jobs in the private sector. There is still a long road ahead, but by removing the red tape that restricts economic development we are on the right path to getting Florida back to work.

The addition of more than 71,000 jobs since the beginning of the year is positive news for all Floridians and businesses and is a potent reminder that by making tough choices, we are doing the right things to turn the economy around.

It was reported today that Florida’s unemployment rate stayed static at 10.7 percent from July to August.

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