The Republican Party of Florida this morning released the much-anticipated audit of its finances, prepared for the party by the law firm Alston & Bird in response to allegations that party leaders used party credit cards to cover personal expenses. Those allegations led to the resignation of Jim Greer as party chair; Greer was later arrested and charged with six felonies.

Alston & Bird’s mission in compiling the 51-page document, which you can read in full or download after the jump, was “to examine expenses incurred by the RPOF as a result of (i) charges on the RPOF’s corporate American Express credit cards; (ii) reimbursements made by the RPOF to individuals who incurred a purported business expense; and (iii) payments made by the RPOF to vendors and/or consultants.”

“We conclude that between 2007 and 2009 a total of $381,786.12 in expenses paid for by the RPOF were primarily not related to RPOF business,” reads the report’s summary, which adds that another $98,000 in expenses were “probably not related to RPOF business.”

We’re sifting through the report for highlights, but you can read in full or download the audit here:

RPOF Audit

0 Shares:
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Florida and the man behind the anti-Sharia movement

The New York Times recently profiled David Yerushalmi, The Man Behind the Anti-Shariah Movement, whose efforts have several Florida ties. For one thing, he's a South Florida native, according to the article. For another, he was the driving force behind an anti-Sharia law that surfaced in Florida and other states.

State senators voice frustration with E-Verify: News. Politics. Media

During last year's election, then-candidate Rick Scott pledged to increase immigration enforcement at the state level. He began fulfilling that pledge on his first day as governor, signing an executive order requiring the state to verify that new hires are eligible to work in the United States using E-Verify. On Monday, during the first of three informational meetings on immigration, state senators — including some who support the use of the program, which is offered to employers by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security — expressed frustration with some of the system's limitations.