They tell us that extending the tax cuts for the rich will somehow create jobs, when we’ve had these tax cuts for the rich for nine years, and I haven’t noticed a whole lot of jobs being created in the last nine years. They tell us it will dramatically boost the economy. Well, I haven’t noticed that happening for the last nine years either. So you really have to wonder why it is they persist in this mania, this obsession of theirs, that we need to have more tax cuts for the rich when the economy is flat on its back, and unemployment is almost 10 percent. I think I have the answer. The answer turns out to be very simple. They want a tax cut for the rich because they want a tax cut for themselves. #

Here’s the clip (via The Daily Caller): #

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