It’s no secret that healthcare costs are currently on the rise in the U.S. In fact, they’re rising faster than average national income.Β 

Just about everyone is paying more for healthcare than they have in the past. Some people, though, are paying a lot more than others. 

Depending on the prescription drugs they need to take, some people are spending hundreds and thousands of dollars every month on medication.

Not sure what medications these people are spending money on? Keep reading.

Listed below are the most expensive drugs currently being sold in the U.S.

Most Expensive Drugs in the U.S.

A lot of people feel that they’re paying too much for prescription drugs. For some people, though, the price of their prescriptions is so high that they’re having to make serious cuts to other parts of their budgets.

Here are some of the most expensive drugs that are doing the most damage to people’s bank accounts:

Actimmune

Actimmune is a drug designed to help patients cope with the symptoms and side effects of conditions like osteoporosis. It’s also used to treat a rare immune system disorder known as chronic granulomatous disease.

Actimmune costs patients more than $52,000 per month. That’s almost an entire year’s salary for the average American.

Daraprim

Daraprim was in the news a lot a few years ago, thanks to “PharmaBro” Martin Shkreli, who increased the cost of the drug from $13.50 per pill to $750 per pill.

The price of Daraprim, which is used to treat individuals with AIDS, as well as those who have recently received organ transplants, is still high. It currently sets patients back about $45,000 each month.

Cinryze

Cinryze is a drug designed to treat a condition known as hereditary angioedema. This rare condition causes various parts of the body to swell.

Cinryze is very close in price to Daraprim. It costs patients a little over $44,000 for a one-month supply.

Unlike Daraprim, which is usually only taken for a few months at a time, angioedema patients need to use Cinryze long-term in order to stay healthy.

Chenodal

Surprise, surprise. Another very expensive drug has ties to Martin Shkreli.

Chenodal is a drug used to dissolve gallstones. It is manufactured by Retrophin, the company Shkreli founded and of which he used to be the CEO.

Chenodal costs patients a little over $42,000 per month. The price of one tablet is $473, and some patients have to take over 200 tablets per month to stay healthy. 

Myalept

Doctors prescribe Myalept to treat a leptin deficiency in patients who suffer from generalized lipodystrophy. Leptin is a hormone that sends signals of fullness to the brain. Leptin deficiency leads to extreme overeating and often results in obesity.

Myalept costs just over $42,000 per month, just like Chenodal.

Patients usually use 10 vials of the drug each month, and each vial costs $4,213. Myalept is the only drug that can be used to treat leptin deficiency, so patients who suffer from this disorder have no choice but to use it.

H.P. Acthar

Used to treat conditions like lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis, H.P. Acthar costs patients nearly $39,000 each month.

H.P. Acthar used to be relatively affordable, with one vial costing just $40 back in 2001. Times have certainly changed since then.

Juxtapid

Doctors prescribe Juxtapid to treat a gene mutation known as homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. This gene mutation leads to cardiovascular disease in many people.

One Juxtapid capsule costs a little more than $1,300 per month, and the average patient takes 28 capsules each month, bringing the total cost of the drug to nearly $37,000.

Harvoni

Harvoni is a once-daily combination drug (the first of its kind) meant to treat Hepatitis C.

All treatments for Hepatitis C are known for being expensive, including Harvoni, which costs patients $31,500 per month. Patients usually take Harvoni for 12 weeks at a time. 

Cuprimine

Having been around since the 1970s, Cuprimine is an old drug that has been costing patients a lot of money for a long time.

Currently, Cuprimine, which removes the buildup of copper that is caused by Wilson’s Disease, costs $31,426 per month. One tablet of Cuprimine must be taken after each meal, and one tablet costs $261.89. 

How to Save Money on Prescription Drugs

If you have been prescribed one of these drugs, or know someone who has, chances are you’re looking for ways to reduce medication costs.

There are a few different approaches you can take to make prescription drugs more affordable, including the following:

Shop Online

Look into online pharmacies before you fill your prescription. You could even consider getting your drugs from an online Canadian pharmacy, where prices can be quite a bit lower than in U.S. pharmacies.

Buy in Bulk

Instead of buying a 30-day supply of a medication, check to see if you can buy a 60- or 90-day supply.

This isn’t always possible, of course. But, buying in bulk can help you save money on co-pays and minimize the cost of your prescription drug purchase as a whole.

Apply for Prescription Drug Assistance

Consider applying for prescription drug assistance, too.

There are a lot of organizations out there designed to help people in need afford their medications.

Some of these programs are sponsored by state and local governments, and others are even created by the drug companies themselves.

Do some research to see what’s available for your specific situation and in your area.

Need More Money-Saving Tips?

You now know which are the most expensive drugs in the U.S.

You also know how you can save money on these and other prescription drugs.

This information is sure to come in handy no matter how much you’re currently spending on prescription drugs. 

Do you need more help in saving money on medications for yourself or your family?

If so, be sure to check out this article that provides additional advice on reducing the cost of prescription drugs.

Don’t forget to also check out the other articles in the Health section of our site for even more tips and tricks on saving money and cutting health care costs across the board.

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