Gov. Rick Scott (Pic via Facebook)

According to a recent poll of opinion leaders in health policy and innovators in health care delivery and finance, almost 90 percent of respondents believe state lawmakers should be implementing the health care reform law.

Parts of the Commonwealth Fund/Modern Healthcare Opinion Leaders Survey results released today show that an overwhelming majority of experts would disagree with Florida’s efforts to stall and block the Affordable Care Act in the state.

According to Modern Healthcare:

A full 89 percent of respondents said it is very important or important that federal and state policymakers continue to move forward to implement the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, according to the final Commonwealth Fund/Modern Healthcare Opinion Leaders Survey.

Survey respondents liked several cost-cutting proposals for Medicare and Medicaid put forth by President Barack Obama in his framework for reducing the federal budget deficit. Among them are adjusting payments to encourage efficient post-acute care, aligning Medicare and Medicaid drug payment policies, and introducing financial incentives to encourage Medicare beneficiaries to use high-value services.

Health care advocates across the state, as well as federal officials, have criticized state lawmakers for stalling the implementation of the health care reform law in the state. Advocates and residents have particularly taken issue with the state turning away millions of federal funds that would have gone to public health programs.

The state of Florida currently has one of the highest rate of uninsured residents in the country. Policymakers in the state are also leading the legal challenge against the health care reform law. It was announced today that the Supreme Court will hear the legal arguments in March 2012.

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