Occupy Jacksonville met for the third week in a row on Saturday, this time to discuss their specific demands. Though the number of protestors dwindled considerably since the group’s first meeting, their proposals have gained strength — and specificity.

Shortly before beginning their march to a nearby Arts Market, Occupy protestors threw around ideas for upcoming protests. Suggestions to stand shoulder-to-shoulder at a local mall, or march in front of Wells Fargo’s new offices were quickly shut down, as both of the buildings are private property. But other ideas — like calling into Jacksonville’s NPR affiliate, and marching outside of this Tuesday’s City Council meeting to protest JP Morgan — were met with enthusiasm. Other motions introduced during Saturday’s meeting included one to take a “firm, antiwar stance” and a motion to petition Jacksonville’s City Council to rename Confederate Park. All of the motions passed.

The organization has now evolved into a handful of working groups — each working on its own specific agenda. The media group is putting together a plan to call in to a local radio show on Jacksonville’s NPR affiliate on Tuesday morning, while the regional politics team is examining state-level legislation that might affect them. Occupy Jacksonville also has a team devoted to examining the Jacksonville City Council, a medical working group, a yoga/meditation team and a minority solidarity group. The group plans to return to Riverside Park this coming Saturday.

Below, some photos from Saturday’s meeting:

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

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