Florida Speaker of the House Dean Cannon, R-Winter Park (right) (Pic by Mark Foley, via myfloridahouse.gov)

Occupy Wall Street-inspired groups from around the state have begun to draft proposals to be handed to House Speaker Dean Cannon, R-Winter Park, on the first day of the Florida legislative session, Jan. 10.

According to the People’s Convention of Florida website, the group has begun compiling proposals from the eight different “working groups” that met earlier this month. The groups each focused on different policy issues — ranging from the environment, foreclosures, immigration, voting rights and reproductive rights.

More than 70 specific policy issues were mentioned in the group’s online forum in which the drafted proposals are listed. The eight working groups tackled infrastructure/public transit, the environment, human rights, electoral reform, education, labor, banking and foreclosure, and taxation.

The groups currently have a preliminary draft (.pdf) and rundown of what happened during the convention posted online.

Here are some of the drafted proposals:

  • Standardized testing shall be used for the purposes of evaluating students and teachers in order to identify areas of improvement, NOT for determining school funding or teacher pay.
  • Public money shall not be used to fund for-profit charter schools, either directly, or through voucher systems.
  • The creation of a public transportation development agency to forward greater utilitarian use and connectivity of public transportation across the state of Florida.
  • We demand a Florida state amendment to hold publicly financed elections for Florida state officials.
  • We demand that voter registration can take place on the day of voting, at the actual voting booth. Those who are not registered before arriving at the voting facility should have the ability to register at the actual time of voting.
  • We demand our state legislature to pass a non-binding resolution to support the over-turning of ‘Citizen’s United vs. FEC’
  • We oppose non-judicial foreclosures of mortgages and any deregulation of the foreclosure process.
  • We demand banks refinance the mortgages to the fair market value for home owners who are struggling to make ends meet especially if they have proof that they lost their job and are looking for a job.
  • We demand no further infringement on worker rights.
  • We demand the protection of the rights of workers to organize. Legalize the rights of farm workers and domestic workers to organize.
  • We demand repealing the law which eliminated K-12 Teacher tenure and stopping any future tenure laws which would repeal tenure for higher education officials.
  • We demand full worker rights to undocumented workers.
  • We oppose anti-immigrant legislation meant to discriminate against and attack undocumented workers and peoples.
  • We demand an end to the attacks on unemployed workers and their benefits and attacks on social safety nets which protect workers in times of hardship.
  • We demand that Florida’s tax structure be reformed to recover revenue from the 1% and to reduce the burden on the 99 percent.
  • We demand the SOFL chooses not to redefine a fetus as a person at conception.
  • We demand that the current definition of a forcible rape and the rights entitled from that remain unchanged.

Two attendees at the event said that about 200 people made it to Orlando for the convention. Attendees came from all over the state — some from as far as Key West. A final version of the proposals that will be handed to Cannon has not yet been finalized.

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