I’ve reported twice now (here and here) on the issue of gulf oil spill victims being told their claims have been expedited, or “escalated,” only to wait days and in some cases weeks without receiving compensation for the losses they incurred.

My post yesterday elicited a number of responses, but one in particular got my attention. A Florida woman, who asked not to be named, told me she went to Gov. Charlie Crist after waiting more than a month with her claim “under review.” After being told in recent weeks that her claim had been “escalated,” she has still not received any payment.

The Gulf Coast Claims Facility became more responsive when Crist got involved, but the woman has yet to be paid. Here’s what the woman had to say, in an email:

A Representative from governor Crist’s office responded and forwarded my email to GCCF and I finally received a call on Friday. Tracy from the escalation department said my claim was in the final stage. I asked how long that would be and she said, “You have my name, I can’t tell you when it will be done because you will write another letter to Governor Crist if it’s not done in that amount of time.”

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