Florida immigrant advocacy organizations are not the alone in their position against immigration enforcement legislation recently announced by state Rep. William Snyder, R-Stuart, and Bill McCollum. The Spanish-language weekly El Sentinel reported Saturday that some in the state’s Republican camp disagree with the law:

U.S Congressmen Lincoln Díaz-Balart, R-Miami said he, “strongly disagrees with McCollum’s proposed immigration law similar to Arizona’s law.”

“It caught me by surprise, he nevef consulted me,” said the Cuban-American who is not up for reelection this year.

His brother, also a U.S. Congressmen, Mario Díaz-Balart, R-Miami, indicated the proposal is not an adequate solution to the illegal immigration problem.

U.S Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Miami, questioned raising the issue at this point in the political race and said the states priority is to deal with the grave economic problem.

“I do not support McCollum’s immigration proposal and I am disappointed about his decision to support it,” said the Cuban-American congresswoman.

Attorney John De Leon, member of the ACLU Miami, doubts the proposal will approved by the Republican majority from South Florida in Tallahassee.

In his opinion, McCollum was pratically obligated to act this way due to the dyanamics the campaign for the governor’s office has taken.

“He is under attack by his Republican opponents; he’s about to face an election primary in hs party. He wants the party’s nomination” added De Leon.

Maria Rodriguez of the Florida Immigrant Coalition told the Sentinel, “We see that during election season irresponsible legislators use resources to attack the most vulnerable communities.”

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