Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum has accepted former health-care executive Rick Scott’s challenge to debate four times before the Aug. 24 Republican primary for governor.

Scott sent a letter to McCollum last Friday, saying, “So today I’m going to break two more insider ‘rules’ and do something frontrunners NEVER do — challenge their opponents to debate AND challenge them to MORE debates than in the last like election. I hereby challenge you to four statewide debates leading up to primary day.”

McCollum told The Buzz Thursday that he will debate Scott. “He’s asked for four debates and I suspect we’ll do four debates. … None of them have been set up yet, but I’m sure they will be,” he added.

McCollum, a former 10-term congressman, trails the political neophyte Scott by 13 points.

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