I was invited onto the Tampa Bay airwaves this afternoon to discuss a piece I penned last week on how gerrymandering has left many in Sarasota’s African-American community feeling like they are under-represented in Tallahassee, and you can listen to the show in full after the jump.

The segment appeared on the show Radioactivity, hosted by WMNF 88.5 FM News & Public Affairs Director — and Florida Independent Community Advisory Board member — Rob Lorei. Lorei also spoke with Jeff Reichert, the writer and director of a new film titled Gerrymandering, which looks at the redistricting process nationwide. During his segment, Reichert called Florida “one of the most gerrymandered states in the nation.”

At about the 25-minute mark, after a slight audio problem that left me out of the loop for a moment, state Rep. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg, whom I interviewed at length for my piece, called in to the show to defend his record of representing his south-of-the-Skyway constituents. During the segment, Rouson pledged to do his best “in this next session to really concentrate more on Sarasota and Manatee counties.”

Worth a listen:

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