Jacksonville mayoral candidate Mike Hogan is today claiming the endorsement of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, despite Hogan joking that bombing an abortion clinic “might cross [his] mind” during a candidate’s forum in February.

Florida Times-Union reporter Abel Harding took to his Twitter account this morning to share the news that Hogan would soon announce that he has secured the endorsement of Bush, with whom he worked during his time in the legislature. According to his website, Hogan voted to cut nearly $700 million in taxes, ”while in the legislature, working with Governor Jeb Bush.” Hogan also acted as Duval County tax collector for 13 years.

The official endorsement announcement came later in the morning, via press release on Hogan’s website. “Mike Hogan is a common sense conservative with a detailed plan to cut wasteful spending and strengthen Jacksonville’s economy,” said Bush, in the release. “Mike stood with me in Tallahassee to cut taxes and fight for real education reform. He was a leader in finding conservative solutions to the challenges Florida faced, and I know Mike will do what’s right for the people of Jacksonville.”

Among Hogan’s other endorsements are the Christian Family Coalition, state Rep. Mike Weinstein, Gov. Rick Scott and the First Coast Tea Party.

Hogan’s opposition, Democrat Alvin Brown, isn’t lacking in endorsements, either. Former President Bill Clinton recorded a robocall for Brown, which went out to supporters on Easter Sunday. Brown, who would be Jacksonville’s first black mayor, also has the backing of former Vice President Al Gore and former St. Joe Company exec Peter Rummell (a noted Republican), who promised to raise $300,000 dollars for Brown’s campaign.

Early voting for the Jacksonville Mayoral election begins Mon., May 2.

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