The University of Florida campus (Pic by Random McRandomhead, via Flickr)

Florida’s Bright Futures program might see some changes in coming months, according to a new report by Capitol News Service.

The state Legislature created the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program in 1997, as a way to reward high school students by helping them pursue a post-secondary degree in Florida. In order to be awarded the scholarship, Florida high school students must receive high SAT or ACT scores, and complete a community service requirement.

Now, the Higher Education Coordinating Council of Florida has plans to alter that slightly — allowing those students who complete college early to use their left over scholarship to pay for grad school.

Via Capitol News Service:

One of the changes would allow students who finish their degrees early to use their left over Bright Futures scholarships to pay for grad school. Ed Moore, President of Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida, says it would free up enrollment space for more students and keep the best and brightest in the state.

“It would help entice them to go to Florida grad schools. If you go to grad school in Florida you are more likely to stay in Florida and work in Florida,” said Moore.

Moore is a member of the Higher Educating Coordinating Council in Florida. The group will give their plans to lawmakers before the end of the year.

 

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