Manuel Guerra — an undocumented immigrant who supports the DREAM Act, and whose deportation case was recently canceled — has earned the backing of some conservatives in Indiantown, Fla.

The DREAM Act would grant people who entered the U.S. illegally before the age of 16 conditional permanent resident status for a period of six years, after which they would be eligible to become legal permanent residents, if they obtain at least an associate-level college degree or serve in the military for two years.

TCPalm.com reports that Austin Parris, “a proud member of his local tea party group” and “a 23-year-old accounting student at Florida Atlantic University, publicly protested the Dream Act less than two years ago — and he now supports it.”

According to the site:

[Parris] also supports Manuel Guerra, an Indiantown resident who illegally crossed the border from Mexico when he was 16 to escape Mexican gangs.

“I think what Manuel did just to get here shows enough drive for someone to be successful in this country,” Parris, who lives in Lake Worth, told me. “And I think that’s reflective of a personal attitude that we want in this country.”

TCPalm adds that more than 600 people in three days signed an online petition supporting Guerra: “Some, including his former Junior ROTC instructor, wrote letters vouching for him.”

The New York Times reported last week that federal immigration authorities canceled Guerra’s deportation, which meant that he “became one of the first illegal immigrants in the country to see results from a policy the Obama administration unveiled” in mid-August that implements a case-by-case review of at least 300,00o deportation proceedings.

0 Shares:
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Orlando public feeding issue back in court, has cost taxpayers $150,000 so far

After five years of protracted legal wrangling and back-and-forth rulings over an Orlando city public feeding ordinance, which restricts the sharing of food with groups of 25 or more within a two-mile radius of city hall, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeal on Tuesday heard arguments in a rare rehearing of a case that has so far cost Orlando taxpayers nearly $150,000 in legal fees.