State Rep. Alan Williams, D-Tallahassee (Pic by <a href=”http://myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/PhotoAlbums/photoAlbum.aspx?MemberId=4437&SessionId=66″>Meredith Geddings</a>)

State Rep. Alan Williams, D-Tallahassee, has introduced an amendment that would include lawmakers in a bill that facilitates random drug testing of state employees. The bill, which is sponsored by state Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Lecanto, has been backed and lobbied by the office of Gov. Rick Scott and is up for a vote on the House Floor tomorrow.

As the bill is currently written, legislators would be exempt from a bill allowing state agencies to randomly drug test their employees. Williams’ amendment, however, would add language stating that the legislature must also implement a drug-free workplace program, with state lawmakers “subject to testing under the program.”

The bill has been criticized by state employees, labor groups and civil rights groups as it has made its way through both the House and Senate. The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida has warned state lawmakers that the law is “unconstitutional” and “duplicative.” Last year’s attempt by Scott to drug test state employees was halted and is now in court.

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