While this office had hoped that the methodology would finally provide some transparency, this document provides no useful information to claimants beyond a simplistic multiplier and is based on very optimistic assumptions about unknown environmental and economic conditions. #

How, exactly, will the fund handle the problem that has been dogging Floridians since this summer: the losses felt in parts of the state where oil never came ashore? That question hinges largely on what economic models the fund will be using. What specific measures will Feinberg take to fulfill his pledge to resolve the inconsistencies in terms of who has gotten paid? What about the claimants whose losses were not covered under the emergency claims process? Wednesday’s announcement provided few answers. #

0 Shares:
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

LeMieux attempts to nix EPA water quality standards

Add Sen. George LeMieux to the pile of politicians trying to delay EPA water quality nutrient standards. LeMieux was one of 21 congressmen to sign an Aug. 2 letter to the EPA that called on the agency to delay its water quality rules until a peer review of the science and an independent economic analysis is conducted. Several weeks later, the EPA responded, arguing that no further review is needed and that the standards will go ahead as planned. Yesterday, the Republican senator took it a step further, introducing an amendment to a spending bill that would have blocked the EPA from spending any money to implement a stricter set of rules.

Fasano speaks out during well-attended parks privatization hearing

Last night's public hearing to discuss a proposal to privatize portions of 56 of Florida's state parks demonstrates that the issue is of major importance to Florida citizens. The meeting was attended by around 400 people, and, because there was not enough room inside, an additional 400 people remained outside, according to estimates from those in attendance.