Paul Magliocchetti, the lobbyist recently indicted on eight counts of making illegal campaign contributions, spread his wealth to more than just Florida candidates. Both Hillary Clinton, who received $1,000, and the recently deceased Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, who also got $1,000, were also among those who received a chunk of Magliocchetti’s change.

According to the Center for Responsive Politics, Magliocchetti and the company donated more than $792,000 to federal-level candidates, most of which was given in recent years. According to a blog on OpenSecrets.org, Magliocchetti and his ex-wives gave at least $475,000 since 2004.

In addition to funneling at least $3,000 to Florida Rep. Ander Crenshaw, R-Jacksonville, Magliocchetti gave Florida Rep. Corrine Brown, D-Jacksonville, $1,000 and Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson a hefty $12,663.

In response to our piece yesterday on Rep. Crenshaw receiving illegal campaign funds, Crenshaw spokesperson Barbara Riley had this to say: “Previous contributions from Paul Magliocchetti that were deemed illegal were donated to charity prior to his indictment. Personal donations from Paul and Mark Magliocchetti will also be donated to charity.”

For a full list of Magliocchetti’s campaign contributions, download a spreadsheet courtesy of The Center for Responsive Politics by clicking here.

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