Tampa Republican Pam Bondi is leading Democrat Dan Gelber, D-Miami, in the race for attorney general in a recent statewide poll, according to the St. Petersburg Times.

The Times reports that a Times/Miami Herald/Bay News 9 poll shows Bondi with a 44 percent to 36 percent lead over Gelber, with 18 percent undecided. The poll has a 4.1 percent margin of error.

Bondi, a prosecutor of nearly 20 years in Hillsborough County, has vowed to continue Florida’s lawsuit against President Obama’s health care legislation, while Gelber opposes continuing the lawsuit.

Both candidates have vowed to get tough on criminals and combat pill mills. Bondi has gone after Gelber dubbing him a “career politician,” while Gelber has maintained that Bondi is a puppet for special interests.

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