Bank of America announced late Monday that it would resume foreclosures in 23 states — including Florida — in which foreclosures must be reviewed by judges.

The bank said it expected to re-submit documents in more than 100,000 foreclosure cases in those states beginning Oct. 25.

As The Florida Independent previously reported, Bank of America had begun reviewing foreclosures in the 23 states in which foreclosures are a judicial process, and later expanded the inquiry nationwide. The review remains in effect in the other 27 states, the bank said in its statement.

The Sun-Sentinel adds:

Also Monday, Ally Financial spokesman James Olecki confirmed that GMAC is re-submitting documents in some foreclosure cases including at least one in Florida “as each of those files is reviewed and remediated when needed.”

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