6 Reasons Why Your Website Sucks (and What You Can Do About It)

Have you ever browsed the website of a big company like Dell or Samsung? Were you impressed with how easily you found what you were looking for, despite the all the complexity of their product lines? I guess you probably were. These websites are built to the highest of professional standards. And as a result, the user experience is seamless.

But all too often, startups fail to emulate the seamlessness generated by the big companies. What seems like it should be straightforward and easy turns out to be a lot more complicated than they imagined. Here are some of the reasons why your website sucks and what you can do about it.

1. Boring headlines

In a world that’s full of low brow content and click-bait, it can be hard for your business to compete. People will click on titles that they find the most titillating, rather than the most informative. Titles which aren’t attractive aren’t going to attract much attention on the internet. They might interest specialists, but not the general public.

Making the titles on your website sexier is an easy first step to making your site more attractive. The next step is to include interesting images and perhaps infographics to reel in even more people. Often it’s just about keeping up with what others in your industry are doing, just to enable you to compete.

2. No blog

If you’ve spent any time browsing the sites of smaller companies, you’ll have noticed a trend over the last few years. They all have blogs. No longer is blogging reserved for foodies and disgruntled youth. It’s a tool that practically everybody is using to drive traffic to their websites. But why?

It all comes down to content. First off, search engines love new content. In fact, they take it into consideration every time they calculate your site’s ranking.

But also, the people looking for your product will probably want to read more about it. That’s why you’ll often find blogs on the sites of companies that sell complex products.

Legal firms, for example, make a point of running blogs that explain how their processes work in layman’s terms. It’s all designed to be helpful, accessible content for potential customers.

3. No website marketing plan

Your website is like the display window at the front of a department store. It’s the public facing part of your business. And it’s got to look good. But all too often, startup websites aren’t fronts for their brands. They’re generic templates that look as if they’ve been thrown together in five minutes.

Building brand identity through your website is an essential part of building a successful business. Because it’s your website that the public and other businesses see, this is what defines you. That’s why it’s so important that it’s good.

Take a couple of hours thinking about exactly what information you want to communicate through your website. What should it be saying about your business? And are there any graphics or logos that you should include to make it consistent?

4. Being too modest

The internet is full of people unashamedly screaming out for attention. Sometimes what they have to offer is good. But most of the time, the content itself is far from ideal.

The problem for the startup, however, is being heard above the noise. This is challenging enough in itself. But often startups will be further hamstrung because they are too modest to seek publicity.

The key to generating interest in your website is to tell your story. It doesn’t have to be War and Peace, of course. It just has to be the story about why your company is unique.

Customers are most interested in your story than you realise. Stories are what draws them into your firm’s brand. It’s what gives customers an affinity with you do. And it’s what gives them something to believe in.

If your startup is an ethical company, you can build this ethical aspect into your brand by telling a story. Perhaps you wanted to set up a chain of healthy, fast-food restaurants because you objected to what the big corporates were doing. This is the type of story that people can really get on board with. And it’s the sort of thing that will align them with your brand.

5. Failing to list on established sites

Even if you do everything right, your website may still get lost in among the billions of pages on the internet. That’s why it’s worth using more established sites to get a leg up.

The first thing that you can do is make comments on other sites. The goal here isn’t necessarily to build links. It’s to create engaging, helpful and meaningful content that will build reputation. As your name floats around the internet, this will divert more traffic to your website and help improve its visibility.

The second thing that you can do is write articles and try to get them published on other websites. This will mean that more people will come into contact with your message. And more potential customers are likely to want to know more about you by going to your website. Guest blogging is an excellent way to get your site known to another site’s audience.

The third thing that you can do is connecting your site through popular social media channels. Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter are all being used right now by businesses to promote their websites and their content.

6. Failing to use pay-per-click advertising

In the early days, very few people will visit your site, if any. The majority of your business will be done through word of mouth and recommendations. But there are limits to that kind of growth in a digital economy. And that’s why pay-per-click advertising is so important.

Essentially, PPC funnels interested customers to your website, dramatically increasing traffic. PPC is moderately expensive for a startup. But it’s something that can be tapered down once you build your reputation and traffic increases naturally. Often PPC advertising pays for itself. Most small businesses will use something like Google Adwords.

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Why Going Virtual is the Perfect Office Solution

One of the most exciting things about being in business is keeping up with the changing technology. The internet and computers are revolutionizing the way that things are done, and for the better. The “virtual office” is one of the greatest inventions of our times, and it will help the entrepreneurs of the future to keep costs down while efficiency stays high.

Virtual offices are dedicated internet spaces accessible from anywhere. They are designed to be utilized by the people in an office. It is meant to replace the brick-and-mortar buildings which have been home to enterprise for so long, whether in whole or in part, and to increase efficiency while reducing costs.

Commuting

With a virtual office, there is no need to travel in order to get there. Simply put the computer on-line and you have arrived. There will be no more commute, there is no need to run to a certain address in order to pick up a document or do just a couple of minutes’ worth of work, and the saving of that time will translate directly into effectiveness at work. Instead of worrying about where you can hold your next meeting, a UK virtual office provider or US provider could give you a meeting room to use whenever you need it.

Flexibility

One of the biggest benefits of the virtual office is the multiplicity of ways in which it can be used. It is accessible from any place and at any time. Every communication is recorded and can be made available to the proper person when appropriate. People can work together or individually, depending on what they find the most comfortable. Freedom from a physical location means that the business organization can take a much less traditional form without any harm to the enterprise.

Funding

If a virtual office can save a business the expense of maintaining a physical establishment, then that funding can be used for business operations or expansion. The number of little costs, prices and taxes that must be paid for a traditional business to maintain a physical location can add up to a substantial sum of money. By investing in a virtual office, nearly all those small expenses can be avoided.

Related: Why More Businesses Than Ever Are Going Virtual

Environment

It is simply better for the environment to use a virtual office to take as much real-world travel and paperwork out as possible. The petrol and energy that it takes to get to a real office is not inconsiderable, and the office supplies required to run a place of business represent an enormous use of irreplaceable resources. All these problems can be solved by opting for a virtual office.

Inspiration

The final, and possibly the greatest, advantage of the virtual office is the inspiration that it brings with it. Employees will no longer be tied to a single building or a single set of work hours. They can address their tasks whenever they feel so inclined, and they can work from anywhere.

Motivated employees will be able to use the virtual office to participate in work activities while traveling or at home, and their time commitment will similarly be freed up.  Happy employees are productive employees, and people who can work during the hours that they themselves know to be the most productive are apt to be the happiest and most productive of all.

Physical offices are no longer a necessity in business, so look into purchasing a virtual office and see if it suits the needs of your business, and you.

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