Scott vetoes ‘Conservation of Wildlife’ bill

Gov. Rick Scott on Friday vetoed a bill that would have allowed for the placement of exotic animals (like zebras and rhinoceros) on public lands. H.B. 1117, known as the Conservation of Wildlife bill, was lambasted by environmental groups that argued it would supplant threatened and iconic Florida species with exotic animals.

Two minutes with Rick Scott on immigration

Asked if Florida should pass an immigration-enforcement law like Georgia's recently approved H.B. 87, Gov. Rick Scott says the federal government needs to do its job: Secure the border, implement a national immigration policy and create a work visa program that actually works.

Earthjustice to file suit against U.S. Forest Service

The environmental law firm Earthjustice today announced that it has filed a 60-day Notice of Intent to Sue the U.S. Forest Service to protect imperiled manatees and shortnose sturgeon, two species the firm alleges are blocked from migrating in the Ocklawaha River because of a dam operated by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

Group invited by West to testify in D.C. says it will sue Scott over textbook law

The Orlando Sentinel is reporting that Citizens for National Security, a Boca Raton-based nonprofit, will file a lawsuit against Gov. Rick Scott, the state and the Florida Department of Education tomorrow. According to the complaint (.pdf) released on the group's website, the suit seeks temporary and permanent injunctive relief rescinding Senate Bill 2120, which requires two state or national experts to review textbook selections.

Scott praised for veto of public records exemption

Gov. Rick Scott quietly signed a handful of bills Friday, including a scaled-back set of income tax cuts and a rulemaking bill that clears up some discrepancies in last year's House Bill 1565, which requires legislative approval for certain new regulations. He also threw down another substantive veto, striking a blow for openness for an administration that has been criticized for its closed and secretive approach to governance.

Newly bipartisan Civil Rights Commission to hold bullying briefing, with focus on LGBT testimony

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights is scheduled to hold a briefing Friday on bullying and “peer-to-peer” violence in K-12 public schools. Specifically, the commission will concentrate on students targeted due to their race, national origin, religion, disability, gender or LGBT status and on what the appropriate federal response should be, with a focus on student needs, programs and the enforcement efforts of the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice.

Sneak peek at Ron Paul’s new book: Liberty Defined

U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, who’s inching toward a decision on a White House run, is releasing his newest book, Liberty Defined: 50 Essential Issues That Affect Our Freedom, on Tuesday. A sneak preview of the introduction to the book is available on the website of Paul’s Campaign for Liberty, the 501(c)4 group he formed after his 2008 presidential bid.

Shifting positions on the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program; funding still an issue

Gov. Rick Scott and state Rep. Rob Schenck, R-Spring Hill, have, for the past few months, been allies in the fight against a statewide Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. But in a matter of days, both men have drastically changed position — Scott testifying on Capitol Hill on the need for harsher regulations in the fight against prescription drugs and Schenck offering an amendment that would allow for the implementation of a pill-monitoring database in Florida.